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Hydrotherapy

Hydrotherapy, or water therapy, is the use of water (hot, cold, steam, or ice) to relieve discomfort and promote physical well-being.

Mist rising off the hot spa water in the Great Bath, part of the Roman Baths in the city of Bath, UK

Origins
The therapeutic use of water has a long history. Ruins of an ancient bath were unearthed in Pakistan and date as far back as 4500 B.C. Bathhouses were an essential part of ancient Roman culture. The use of steam, baths, and aromatic massage to promote well being is documented since the first century.
By the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, bathhouses were extremely popular with the public throughout Europe. Public bathhouses made their first American appearance in the mid 1700s.

Purpose
Hydrotherapy can soothe sore or inflamed muscles and joints, rehabilitate injured limbs, lower fevers, soothe headaches, promote relaxation, treat burns and frostbite, ease labor pains, and clear up skin problems.

Today
Spas, and Luxury Hotels, are starting to cater to the luxury and the healing benefits of hydrotherapy all around the world.

Hydrotherapy Can Be Broken Down Into 3 Key Components.

HEAT

During exercise or strain on the muscles, lactic acid is produced. Lactic acid removal is sped up by heat, allowing the muscles to become less fatigued and recover faster. Additionally, moving hot water increases this effect by increasing heat conduction.

BUOYANCY

Buoyancy is an upward force exerted by a liquid, gas or other fluid that opposes the weight of an immersed object.  When submerged, there is less pressure on the body, tissues, and muscles.

MASSAGE

Massage is the manipulation of superficial and deeper layers of muscle and connective tissue to enhance function, aid in the healing process, and promote relaxation and well-being.

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